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LA Social Science interviewed Dr. Marcus Hunter, Scott Waugh Endowed Chair in the UCLA Division of Social Sciences, Professor of Sociology and African American Studies, and Mr. Christian D. Green, M.A. in African American Studies at UCLA and current adjunct professor. They discussed their role on the national, local, and regional events celebrating the legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. that took place on January 18. Dr. Hunter participated in the 4th Annual National Day of Racial Healing. They discussed their work with legislators, media, and community-based organizations.  Specifically, they discuss the educational resources they are advocating to be part of the U.S. Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT) Commission and Reparations for African Americans and at the local level.

Learn more about the January 18 events HERE.

 

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On January 18th, 2022, the 4th Annual National Day of Racial Healing will take place. Alongside a slate of national, local, and regional events hosted and sponsored by the Kellogg Foundation, Dr. Marcus Anthony Hunter, the Scott Waugh Endowed Chair in the Division of the Social Sciences, Professor of Sociology and African American Studies at UCLA, will be moderating a culminating panel on Facebook Live with Congresswoman Barbara Lee, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, Dr. Gail Christopher, and Dr. Ron Daniels. The panel will focus on and bring further awareness to legislative efforts on the Hill to enact the first-ever U.S. Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT) Commission and Reparations for African Americans.

RSVP for the virtual panel HERE.

For more information, click HERE.

Check back with LA Social Science for interviews and more posts regarding the issues discussed in this panel.

UCLA Sociology Ph.D. candidate Josefina Flores Morales is a sociology doctoral candidate at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests include: social demography, race/ethnicity, immigration, and health. In this interview, she discusses her article that analyzes Twitter discourse about undocumented immigrants during COVID.

 

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UCLA Sociology PhD candidate Debanjan Roychoudhury discusses policing, police misconduct, and police policy with LA Social Science. Roychoudhury, who grew up in New York City, examines NYPD data regarding stop and frisk and references his work “South Side We Outside: Policing and Placemaking in Historic Jamaica Queens New York,” as well as providing insight into his teaching pedagogy.

 

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Uriel Serrano is a PhD candidate in Sociology and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He is currently a Teaching Associate in the UCLA Department of Sociology. His research explores questions around race and gender, children and youth, social movements and resistance, neighborhood institutions, and abolition and intersectionality in the context of carceral violence. His work is grounded in theories of intersectionality, critical youth studies, and critical carceral studies to examine political mobilization by Black and Latinx youth, gender ideologies, carceral logics, and youth-well-being in an inner-city context. Mr. Serrano examines how carceral systems and logics function, persist and are challenged, and how experiences differ across social contexts and social locations.

 

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UCLA Sociology Professor Edward Walker, was recently featured in a video chronicling the increase in misinformation campaigns across the country that have been particularly visible since the pandemic began. The video by Scripps Media will be used as a tool for their ongoing NewsLit media literacy project. As an expert on social movements, Dr. Walker says: “Astroturfing is an effort to mobilize the mass public in a way that distances that mobilization from the person who is sponsoring it or the organization that’s sponsoring it.”

To learn more, watch the full video HERE.

 

Dr. S. Michael Gaddis, assistant professor of sociology at UCLA, recently wrote an op-ed published in The Hill titled “Millennials and the Great Reckoning on Race.” He writes that although Millenials appear to support “post-racial” attitudes, their “…actions speak louder than words.”  Dr. Gaddis writes: “Unfortunately, the actions of Millennials in recent research I conducted, with Raj Ghoshal of Elon University, suggest that Millennials still engage in racial discrimination and hold deep-seated racial prejudices and stereotypes. Let’s hold off on passing out the participation trophies for a moment.”

To read his informative and thoughtful essay, click HERE.

To learn more about his research, check out this article written by Jessica Wolf for UCLA Newsroom, “Are millennials really as ‘post-racial’ as we think?

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Desi Rodriguez-Lonebear, assistant professor of sociology and American Indian Studies at UCLA, was interviewed on missing and murdered Indigenous women by “Vice News Tonight.” This episode investigates how Indigenous women and girls go missing and are murdered at an alarming rate in the United States. Vice News visits tribal communities in Montana facing the crisis head-on.

To watch the interview, click HERE.

As a guest author for Scatterplot, Dr. Aliza Luft, UCLA assistant professor of sociology, makes the case that American leaders have switched sides, embraced the Nazi separation playbook during this current administration, and turned their backs on agreements that Americans made during the “Greatest Generation” seventy-eight year ago. Dr. Luft makes clear that children are being hurt by xenophobic policy, and she reminds us of history, while allowing no excuses for inaction.

Dr. Luft’s historical comparison is timely and a call to action. To read the essay, click HERE.

In the latest interview in the book series, UCLA Professor Laura E. Gomez discusses her new book Inventing Latinos: A New Story of American Racism where she provides a historical and comprehensive examination of how Latinos have become constructed as a racialized group in the United States. Professor Gomez also offers clear and powerful strategies to combat racism against Latinos in the United States.

Interview Chapters:

0:57 – What is the genesis of this book?

3:18 – How is Latin American history connected to Latinos becoming a racial group in the US?

6:06 – Latino integration into America?

9:49 – What are the racial barriers Latinos face?

15:37 – When does the book come out? And why should we get it?

To learn more, check out Professor Gomez’s book Inventing Latinos: A New Story of American Racism

 

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