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LA Social Science spoke with Dr. Tomer Begaz, Professor of Emergency Medicine at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and Director of Undergraduate Medical Education at UCLA-Olive View Medical Center, about his recent “Golden Apple” teaching award, how to keep safe from COVID-19 as our state starts to reopen, and when individuals should visit the Emergency Department.

Interview Chapters:

0:00 – Intro

01:00 – About being a Golden Apple Award winner

02:28 – An album or book that’s gotten you through the pandemic?

05:11 – Why did you choose to work at LA County UCLA Olive View Medical Center?

07:00 – Impact of Corona virus on different communities

10:08 – What should we be thinking about as we open up during the pandemic?

12:53 – When should I go into the emergency room?

17:41 – Alternative ways to see a doctor

18:15 – Closing

 

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Demonstrators march through the streets of Hollywood, California, on June 2, 2020, to protest the death of George Floyd at the hands of police. – Anti-racism protests have put several US cities under curfew to suppress rioting, following the death of George Floyd. (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP) (Photo by ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images)

In this important piece featured in the Los Angeles Times, UCLA’s Dr. Marcus Anthony Hunter, Scott Waugh Endowed Chair in the Division of the Social Sciences, professor of sociology, and chair of the department of African American Studies, presents a conversation he recently had with some of the nation’s foremost writers on Los Angeles to discuss how the city’s racial history informs the present moment and the continued fight against racism and injustice.

Dr. Hunter writes:

“Black people’s lives have remained vulnerable and unprotected by the very government that abolished the institution of slavery. As the planter class took its last sips of power and blood, they managed to bequeath us a century and a half of debt and devastation. Racism is their lasting hex on a country that would dare to try and outlive them, an institutionally effective death spell killing black people every day.”

To read the full article, “How Does L.A.’s Racial Past Resonate Now? #Blacklivesmatter’s Originator and 5 Writers Discuss,” click HERE.

The UCLA California Policy Lab has released their fourth policy brief focused on Unemployment Insurance (UI) claims in California since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in mid-March. The latest policy brief, “An Analysis of Unemployment Insurance Claims in California During the COVID-19 Pandemic,” focuses on the increasing number of workers who are returning to work and seeing their unemployment claims either reduced or denied altogether as a result.  Although returning to work may signal good news for the economy, the brief highlights how this can create some challenging decisions for workers, especially if they’re being called back on a reduced schedule with reduced earnings that result in them losing all or part of their UI benefits in addition to childcare and health safety issues.

To read the press release, click HERE.

To read the full report, click HERE.

Key Research Findings

1. In a sign of improving economic conditions, the fraction of UI beneficiaries either not receiving their first benefit payment because their earnings were too high or receiving partial UI benefits increased in the first half of May. Only workers earning less than three quarters of their prior weekly wages qualify for partial UI and FPUC (and workers earning above that are denied UI benefits entirely for that week), creating a difficult decision for workers in an uncertain labor market.

2. In the weeks preceding May 16th, the period preceding last week’s Jobs Report, a total of 0.46% of the California labor force in April either received partial UI or were denied benefits because of excess earnings (compared to a one and a half decline in the national unemployment rate). Hence, a substantial fraction of individuals that recently returned to work are working reduced hours and may still be attached to the Unemployment Insurance system.

3. As layoffs become more evenly distributed across industries, the share of UI claims by more educated workers have been gradually increasing. Among higher educated workers that claimed benefits recently, Generation Z (age 16-23), women, and those working in Health Care and Social Assistance were most affected.

4. During the past four weeks, about 70% of initial UI claimants reported that they expected to be recalled. However, differences in recall expectations are growing, with 62% of Black workers who filed claims from May 17th to May 30th saying they expect to be recalled vs. 72% of White, 73% of Hispanic, and 74% of Asian workers.

5. The cumulative impact of the crisis is still substantially greater for less advantaged workers – over 1 in 4 women (as opposed to 1 in 5 men), more than 1 in 3 members of Generation Z, and more than 1 in 2 workers with a high school degree have filed for benefits.

6. As the economy slowly re-opens, programs such as Work Sharing, which allow working claimants to keep a share of their UI benefits and maintain eligibility for the $600 FPUC payment, would help strengthen the financial outlook for workers if they’re working at reduced time and earnings.


To read LA Social Science’s previous coverage of the CPL’s briefs in this series, click HERE.

UCLA’s Luskin Center for History and Policy (LCHP) has continued to be a leading voice in connecting past to present. The center’s “Then & Now” podcast has tackled some of the most challenge topics of the day by connecting them to the past. The latest conversation is with Dr. Robin D.G. Kelley, in which he and Dr. David Myers discuss the current history-making events. LCHP writes:

“Political philosopher Hannah Arendt famously argued – in the case of SS officer Adolf Eichmann – that ordinary people can easily become complicit in evil acts as part of a larger system of injustice and inequality. In this special episode, we discuss the concept of ‘the banality of evil’ with Robin Kelley, prominent scholar and professor of U.S. and African American History. As protests spread across the country over the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and so many more, Professor Kelley shares with us his perspectives on our shared responsibilities, revolutionary pessimism, and the historian’s role in the pursuit of justice.”

To hear this informative podcast, click HERE.

Prayagraj: Migrants arrive to board Shramik special train to travel to native places, during the ongoing COVID-19 lockdown, at Prayagraj Railway Station, Thursday, May 28, 2020. (PTI Photo)(PTI28-05-2020_000152B)

India’s largest media network, ABP Live, recently published UCLA Professor of History and Asian American Studies Dr. Vinay Lal‘s latest essay, “‘Be Still And Do Not Move’: The COVID-19 Migrant and the Ministry of the Soul,” about the global pandemic. Dr. Lal takes a historic look at the imposed countrywide “lockdown” that the government of India instituted more than two months ago. Dr. Lal provides some historical examples to expose the draconian move by Prime Minister Modi. To read the complete essay, click HERE.

Also, check out his informative blog, “Lal Salaam: A Blog by Vinay Lal,” “a series of articles on the implications of the coronavirus for our times, for human history, and for the fate of the earth.” You may read his earlier essays on LA Social Science.

Subscribe to LA Social Science and be the first to learn more insight and knowledge from UCLA social science experts in upcoming video/audio sessions and posts about current issues.

 

UCLA’s Luskin Center for History and Policy has published a report, “All is Not Well in the Golden State: The Scourge of White Nationalism in Southern California,” that examines white nationalism’s history, ideology, and present-day operations, and provides some recommendations for confronting the dangers it poses. An amazing group of undergraduates were overseen by Ph.D. candidate Sarah Johnson, and Professor David N. Myers, director of the Luskin Center for History and Policy.

This report examines the history, ideological pillars, use of the internet, and maps how white nationalism is being implemented. The report concludes with three policy suggestions that include increasing education and training, and providing media literacy training to parents and teachers. It also provides a ratings scale intended as a tool for teachers, parents, and others to identify stages in the absorption of white nationalist ideas:

  1. Accidental Absorption
  2. Edgy Transgression
  3. Political Provocation
  4. Overt Hate
  5. Physical Violence

All of these tools are recommended to help stop the spread of white nationalist activity.

To read the Executive Summary, click HERE.

To read the full report, click HERE.

To listen to undergraduate co-authors, Grace Johnston-Glick, Gavin Quan, and James Nee, discuss the report on the UCLA LCHP “Then & Now” podcast, click HERE.

Summer 2020 starts this month, and LA Social Science will continue to highlight some of the summer courses being offered within the Division of Social Sciences at UCLA.

UCLA summer courses are open to BOTH UCLA students and non-UCLA students. All summer 2020 courses will be offered online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. You can enroll as long as you are 15 years of age or older by the first day of summer, and you do NOT have to be enrolled in an academic institution in order to participate in UCLA Summer Sessions. For more information, click HERE.

Check out Professor Brian Hurwitz’s UCLA ONLINE summer course, “Sex in the Cinema.” Since the Lumière brothers first screened their short films to an astonished Parisian audience in 1895, movies have continued to leave an indelible imprint on media studies and communication rhetoric. They influence the way we walk, talk, dress and dine. Simultaneously, the medium has profoundly affected our perception of beauty, romance, intimacy and love. Yet much like fashion, such perceptions have been routinely altered owing to evolutions and revolutions in social, political and institutional conditions.

This course examines the contextual forms and factors that have directly led to film shaping the way we communicate about sex and sexuality. Starting at the dawn of the twentieth century, we will engage in a decade-by-decade analysis of cultural norms, the movies that were made in accordance with them and the ones that were produced in opposition to them. This examination will further explore how the cinema has informed our attitudes towards gender identity, cultural taboos and social movements. By evaluating the manner in which erotic imagery is presented and how sexual symbolism is represented, students will gain an understanding of how past, present and future views on sex and sexuality are impacted by the cinema.

For more information about this course, see the preview video below, and enroll HERE TODAY!

 

Today, UCLA Dean of Social Sciences Darnell Hunt appeared on The Lead CNN with Jake Tapper to discuss police brutality and the breaking news of the day dealing with the nationwide protests against racism and injustice.  Watch the video of the interview HERE.

In addition, Dean Hunt has recently been asked by numerous media outlets to provide his expert insight on the current events. Check out each of the links below.

  • 5/29 – Opinion: America Is a Tinderbox

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/29/opinion/george-floyd-protests-minneapolis.html

  • 5/30 – ‘Riots,’ ‘violence,’ ‘looting’: Words matter when talking about race and unrest, experts say

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/05/31/george-floyd-riots-violence-looting-words-matter-experts-say/5290908002/

  • 5/31 – 示威失控 UCLA專家:背後根本原因是白人至上

https://www.taiwandaily.net/%E7%A4%BA%E5%A8%81%E5%A4%B1%E6%8E%A7-ucla%E5%B0%88%E5%AE%B6%EF%BC%9A%E8%83%8C%E5%BE%8C%E6%A0%B9%E6%9C%AC%E5%8E%9F%E5%9B%A0%E6%98%AF%E7%99%BD%E4%BA%BA%E8%87%B3%E4%B8%8A/

  • 5/31 – George Floyd death: Why do some protests turn violent?

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52869563

  • 6/1 – The 1992 Rodney King Riots and Today’s Looting and Rioting in LA (Background Briefing with Ian Masters Podcast)

https://soundcloud.com/user-830442635/the-1992-rodney-king-riots-and-todays-looting-and-rioting-in-la

  • 6/1 – Protests for racial justice: Faculty share insights on responses to the killing of George Floyd

https://newsroom.ucla.edu/stories/protests-racial-justice-george-floyd

  • 6/1 – Retailers and restaurants across the U.S. close their doors amid protests

https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/06/01/retailers-restaurants-across-us-close-their-doors-amid-protests/

  • 6/2 – Christian Science Monitor

https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Justice/2020/0602/See-the-fire-George-Floyd-and-the-effects-of-violent-protest

  • 6/2 – George Floyd: Mengapa demonstrasi damai memprotes kematian George Floyd bisa berubah menjadi kerusuhan

https://www.bbc.com/indonesia/dunia-52887527

  • 6/2 – MTV and Comedy Central pause to honor George Floyd, but much of Hollywood remains on the sidelines

https://www.thetelegraph.com/entertainment/article/MTV-and-Comedy-Central-pause-to-honor-George-15310227.php

  • 6/2 – What Should We Expect From Entertainment Companies When It Comes to Fighting Racism?

https://www.thewrap.com/hollywood-entertainment-companies-fight-racism-black-lives-matter/

  • 6/2 – There isn’t a simple story about looting

https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2020/6/2/21278113/looting-george-floyd-protests-social-unrest

  • 6/3 – ‘Do the Right Thing’: The best films by black directors on Netflix

https://filmdaily.co/news/black-directors-netflix/

  • 6/3 – From AppleTV+ to Netflix: Stories Focus on African-Americans Chasing the American Dream

https://www.wsj.com/articles/from-appletv-to-netflix-stories-focus-on-african-americans-chasing-the-american-dream-11591211546

  • 6/3 – Que devons-nous attendre des entreprises de divertissement lorsqu’il s’agit de lutter contre le racisme?

https://www.urban-fusions.fr/2020/06/03/que-devons-nous-attendre-des-entreprises-de-divertissement-lorsquil-sagit-de-lutter-contre-le-racisme/

  • 6/4 – On The Politics Of Using The Word “Fascist”

https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL2006/S00018/on-the-politics-of-using-the-word-fascist.htm

  • 6/4 – Porque se vandalizam e pilham lojas no meio de protestos pacíficos? A lógica do looting

https://shifter.sapo.pt/2020/06/black-lives-matter-looting-pilhagem/

  • 6/4 – 全美暴動…為何和平抗議會變「暴力搶劫」?專家揭背後真相

https://www.setn.com/News.aspx?NewsID=754444

UCLA Associate Professor Chris Zepeda-Millán demonstrates most Americans would support immigrant child detainees being released and having access to medical care. Dr. Zepeda-Millán’s data illustrates that the current administration’s immigration policies regarding child detainees are not supported by public opinion. He further notes this can be a bipartisan issue elected officials can rally around in order to provide humanity and aid to child detainees.

Interview Chapters:

0:00 – Intro

0:46 – How has Covid-19 impacted incarcerated populations and immigrant detention centers?

4:41 – What does your data reveal in terms of public support for treating and releasing child detainees? Implications?

7:23 – If there is an overwhelming amount of support to protect and release child detainees why is the current administration choosing not to?

To learn more about Dr. Chris Zepeda-Millán‘s forthcoming book, Walls, Cages, and Family Separation: Race and Immigration Policy in the Trump Era (under contract with Cambridge University Press) with Sophia Jordán Wallace (University of Washington), check out a recent brief by the Latino Policy & Politics Initiative (LPPI) that draws on portions of the book. Titled “COVID-19 & Migrant Child Detainees: Releasing & Treating Children in Detention” (May 2020), the brief provides evidence of public support for releasing child detainees during the coronavirus pandemic, noting the poll took place before COVID-19 began. It also provides “straightforward, bipartisan, and implementable” policy recommendations. To read the full brief, click HERE.

 

Subscribe to LA Social Science and be the first to learn more insight and knowledge from UCLA social science experts in upcoming video/audio sessions and posts about current issues.

Summer 2020 starts this month, and LA Social Science will continue to highlight some of the summer courses being offered within the Division of Social Sciences at UCLA.

UCLA summer courses are open to BOTH UCLA students and NON-UCLA students. All Summer 2020 courses will be offered online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. You can enroll as long as you are 15 years of age or older by the first day of summer and you do NOT have to be enrolled in an academic institution in order to participate in UCLA Summer Sessions. For more information, click HERE.

UCLA’s Department of Anthropology has several summer course offerings. Check out the course list below. Enroll HERE TODAY!

Session A:

ANTHRO 142P – Anthropology of Religion

Survey of various methodologies in comparative study of religious ideologies and action systems, including understanding particular religions through descriptive and structural approaches, and identification of social and psychological factors that may account for variation in religious systems cross-culturally.

ANTHRO 143 – Economic Anthropology

Introduction to anthropological perspectives for interpretation of economic life and institutions. Economic facts to be placed in their larger social, political, and cultural contexts; examination of modes of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services in their relation to social networks, power structures, and institutions of family, kinship, and class.

ANTHRO 153 – Language and Identity

Language as social phenomenon. Introduction to several angles from which language use can be critically examined as integral to interactions between individuals and between social groups.

Other Session A offerings:

ANTHRO 3 – Culture and Society

ANTHRO 110 – Principles of Archaeology

ANTHRO 124S – Evolution of Human Sexual Behavior

ANTHRO 133 – Anthropology of Food

ANTHRO 137P – Anthropology of Deviance and Abnormality

Session C:

ANTHRO 126P – Paleopathology

Evidence of disease and trauma, as preserved in skeletal remains of ancient and modern human populations. Discussions of medical procedures (trepanation), health status, ethnic mutilation (cranial deformation, footbinding), cannibalism, and sacrifice and roles such activities have played in human societies.

ANTHRO 132 – Anthropology of Environment

Environmental anthropology explores relationship between complex human systems and environments in which they are entangled. Examination of how people impact and are impacted by their environments, and how relationships between people are negotiated through management of place and space throughout time. Traces multiple theoretical lineages, beginning with early work in cultural ecology and including political ecology, environmental history, contested ontologies, and contemporary environmental justice. Through engagement with grounded, multimodal ethnographies (in text, film, and new media), study of historical movements of people across ecosystems, politics of managing common goods resources such as rivers and atmosphere, bioeconomics of environmental contamination, and development of climate change adaptation strategies in hard-hit areas.

ANTHRO 138P – Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology

Introduction to skills and tools of data ascertainment through fieldwork in cultural anthropology. Emphasis on techniques, methods, and concepts of ethnographical research and how basic observational information is systematized for presentation, analysis, and cross-cultural comparison.

Other Session C offerings:

ANTHRO 1 – Human Evolution

ANTHRO 4 – Culture and Communication

ANTHRO 135 – Visual Anthropology

ANTHRO 146 – Urban Anthropology